2016-2017 Lecture Schedule

September 9, 2016
The Way of the Dream (Conversations with Dr. Marie-Louise von Franz): Film, Panel, and Discussion
Marie-Louise von Franz, second generation Jungian analyst, was Jung’s student, colleague, and collaborator in his alchemy studies and writing. In this film she discusses the important role dreams play in offering guidance and meaning to our lives. With deep presence, clarity and humor, she illuminates this often overlooked yet universal human activity.

A panel discussion with Jungian Analysts Thayer Greene, Penny Tarasuk and Erica Lorentz will follow with time for questions from the audience.

October 7, 2016
Penny Tarasuk: Psyche in Conflict: The Paradox of Healing

Conscious and unconscious do not make a whole when one of them is suppressed and injured by the other,… both are aspects of life. Consciousness should defend its reason and protect itself, and the chaotic life of the unconscious should be given the chance of having it’s way too—as much of it as we can stand. —CW 9i, p. 288

Invited by Georgia O’Keeffe, Ciel Bergman lived and painted in Abiquiu, New Mexico. Through her life & works, especially her series titled Antidotes, we appreciate the enormous tension carried by the artist (the instrument and spokesperson for the spirit of the times) on behalf of the collective.

Penelope Tarasuk, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) was the Jung Institute of Boston’s first student in 1979. In practice 45 years, she has enjoyed many roles: psychotherapist, analyst, teacher, group facilitator, supervisor, and Director of Curriculum at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston.

November 4, 2016
Richard Nicoletti: Presidential Election of 2016: An Evolution or Devolution of Patriarchy?
(Note Location change – Stoddard Hall)

A talk and discussion hoping to inform your appreciation of archetypes and politics. Archetypal patterns from Greek mythology can enhance our understanding of this historical campaign. According to Hesiod’s Theogony, the first three generations of “gods” established quintessential Patriarchy. Their progeny became the enemy. Can we find Kronos in Donald Trump? Athena in Hillary Clinton? Poseidon in Bernie Sanders? Greek archetypal “heroes” confirmed “crony” Patriarchy, and brought us human tragedy. One psychoanalytical view of Sophocles’ Oedipus starts with Tantalus and his colossal pride. How does Trump compare with Tantalus? Does Hillary have anything in common with Jocasta, mother of Oedipus? Can an understanding of Laius, father of Oedipus, inform our dearth of “polis” (the ideal city state) and of Jungian Eros? We sometimes learn from our mistakes. Other times we repeat them.

Richard Nicoletti, JD, Jungian Analyst (IAAP), former corporate lawyer, graduate of C.G. Jung Institute, Boston; office in Keene, NH (works as well in real time Internet video), primarily with fathers and sons looking to find love and renewal among Oedipal patterns of abuse, intrusion, rejection and abandonment.

December 2, 2016
Thayer Greene: Exploring Our Dreams: Deeply Personal and Yet Objective and Universal

The symbolic language of the dream draws upon inner images and affects to guide and challenge the limited, one-sided attitudes and perceptions of our conscious ego awareness. Beneath the layer of our individual dreams lies a collective layer of universal patterns of human experience that Jung described as archetypal. This lecture will demonstrate how the deeply personal is also objective and archetypal.

Thayer Greene, PhD, Jungian Analyst (IAAP), trained in New York and Zurich, Switzerland. He practices in Amherst, MA and is presently a training analyst of the C.G. Jung Institute, Boston. He has written a book and many articles in the field.

January 8, 2017 (Sunday 1pm-4pm)*
*NOTE: Please note this lecture is on Sunday at 1pm.
Erica Lorentz: Recovering the Feminine Erotic Soul in all of Us

What power does the feminine erotic soul hold for us in the contemporary world? This aspect of the feminine, hidden and maligned in most modern cultures, is a healing life force crucial to our spirituality, humanity, and world. From the Paleolithic Goddess to the mystics and into modern life, we will trace the roots of the feminine erotic soul and bring it from obscurity into our modern lives where it belongs. Image and music will illustrate the healthy and wounded aspects of this vital force.

Erica Lorentz, MEd, LPC, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) has a private practice in Northampton, MA. She is president of the Jung Association of Western Mass, a training analyst with the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston where she sat on the Training Board and was the Curriculum Coordinator. Since the 1980s she has lectured and taught workshops in the US and Canada.

February 3, 2017
Anita Greene: Soul and Psyche: The Same or Different?

Jung observed in the psyche of his patients a religious instinct that was just as strong as the sexual instinct. He described it as an instinct toward wholeness. Although at times he used psyche and soul interchangeably, he was deeply aware of the much larger dimension of soul. In our post-Christian era, does the cultural preoccupation with the psychological ignore, and, perhaps, deprive us of the deeper spiritual experience of soul?

Anita Greene, PhD, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) and Rubenfeld Synergist is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and teaches at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston. She has a private practice in Amherst.

March 3, 2017
Sarah Jackson: Age and Beauty

Why is it that an old house, table or tree may appear beautiful to us, while an old woman usually does not? Age seems to augment beauty in many instances, but not when it comes to the human form. We humans create and appreciate various kinds of beauty, but we seem to enjoy and exploit youthful beauty — especially that of the young females of our species — to an extraordinary degree. As a result, this is a difficult culture in which to get old, perhaps especially if you are a woman. In this lecture, Sarah will examine how Jung’s psychology, as well as the psyche itself, enlivens and expands our sense of beauty in order to help us face the a process of aging, as well as the inevitable adventure of death itself.

Sarah Jackson, MFA, MA, LP, Jungian Analyst (IAAP), visual artist and writer. She has a private practice in Great Barrington MA and Hillsdale NY. She is working on a group of essays on different aspects of beauty that with any luck, will eventually become a book.

April 7, 2017

Ellen Peck: Pity and Terror: The Use of Theater in the Ancient Healing Process
If you were in need of therapy in the classical world, you might visit an Asclepion—a sacred healing center dedicated to the god of medicine Asclepius. Each of these centers had theaters and presumably used drama to stimulate healing dreams. How might these two arts have worked together? What healing can we find in the theater today?

Ellen Peck received her PHD from Stanford in English and American Literature. She has taught literature and modern drama at Wellesley and Mt. Holyoke. In her second career she has been a docent for the classical art collections at the Mt. Holyoke and Springfield Museums. She is interested in how Jung’s thought and literature work together.

May 5, 2017
Jason Smith: Religious But Not Religious: The Need for a Symbolic Life

“We are all badly in need of the symbolic life.” ~ C.G. Jung

The living process of the unconscious, taught Carl Jung, is more aptly expressed by religious symbols than by scientific formulas. What does it mean to live a symbolic life? Where does religious experience fit in an increasingly diverse and pluralistic world? We will explore these questions and see how Jung’s understanding of the religious function of the psyche offers a middle way between a religious attitude characterized by the extremes of uncritical belief on the one hand, and undiscriminating rejection on the other.

Jason E. Smith, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) has a private practice in Manchester-by-the-Sea, MA. His areas of focus include dreamwork, depression, trauma, and spiritual development. Jason is a graduate of Pacifica Graduate Institute and the C.G. Jung Institute-Boston.

2015-2016 Lecture Schedule

2015-2016 Lecture Schedule

September 11, 2015
Dancing in the Flames: Marion Woodman Film and Panel
NOTE: For this lecture we will meet in Hillyer Graham Hall in the Fine Arts Building, Smith College 
 
This powerful, provocative, and insightful film explores the transformational life of one of the West’s most important wisdom keepers. It sends a clarion call to a planet in the midst of “a shedding of its outworn skin.” Renowned Jungian analyst and author Marion Woodman is celebrated for her work on feminine psychology and addiction, but her words and her wisdom speak to nearly everyone. 
 
Jungian Analysts Anita Greene, Thayer Greene, and Karen Smyers will lead a discussion with the audience following the film.
 
October 2, 2015
David Stephenson Bond: Living Myth: Personal Meaning as a Way of Life
 
This lecture explores the dilemma of how to live life creatively at a time when the dominant myths of our culture are losing their power to give meaning to our lives. Using C. G. Jung’s idea of discovering a “personal myth” we will reflect on the psychology of mythic imagination as a force in both culture and individual life. This lecture offers insights into the possibilities of cultural renewal and individual meaning through the restoration of the imagination.
 
David Stephenson Bond, Jungian analyst (IAAP) practices in Methuen, MA and is the author of Living Myth (1993), The Archetype of Renewal (2003), and the novels Healing Lily (2010) and My Stranger (2012).
 
November 6, 2015
Penny Tarasuk: Accepting Psyche’s Gift – The Dream
 

“I have found an exceptionally wonderful place where pilgrims come to reap the benefits of the waters…”

 

Dreams help guide during the first half of life in slaying of the dragon of unconsciousness, leaving “home,” establishing the outer world of love, work, play, and glimpses of the numinous. The second half requires that we must attend the marriage within and accept the necessity of surrendering the heroic attitude of the ego complex and reliance on the material world. If attended, dreams help in the development of a symbolic life, deepen our sense of meaning, and can assist in bringing life to conclusion.
 
Penelope Tarasuk, Jungian Analyst (IAAP), has been working for 40 years in the United States and abroad focusing on dreams, active imagination, nature, creativity, trauma, and body in spiritual development.
 
December 4, 2015
Thayer Greene: Psychic Transformation in the Analytic Process
 
Jung advanced his experiential thesis that there are within each individual potentials for transformation toward the wholeness of the individual personality. Such transformations occur within many life contexts including the analytic relationship. Using many examples, Thayer will explore the stages in embodied psychic transformation (i.e. individuation) mediated by the Jungian vision and method.
 
Thayer Greene, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) is a graduate of the Jung Institute of New York, and a training analyst at the Jung Institute of Boston. He has a private practice in Amherst. 
 
January 10, 2016Sunday 1-4PM (NOTE DAY CHANGE – NOT FRIDAY)
Erica Lorentz: Introduction to Alchemical Symbols of Transformation
 
We will explore some processes and symbols in alchemy, the ancient discipline that sought to transform our inner mundane prima materia into a substance of great psychological and spiritual value. At the end of the Red Book, Jung discovered that the rich symbolic system of the alchemists described his own experiential method of active imagination and his theory of individuation. Alchemical prints and film clips will illustrate the relevance of these symbols today.
 
Erica Lorentz, M.Ed., L.P.C., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) has a private practice in Northampton, MA and is the President of the Jung Association of Western MA. She is a training analyst and on the Training Board of the Jung Institute of Boston and has lectured and facilitated workshops throughout the US and Canada.
 
February 5, 2016
Anita Greene: The Embodied Unconscious
 
Using an embodied approach to the unconscious one can be more fully present not only to the images that bubble up but to the emotional impact and challenge to our ego’s sense of identity. Jungians are often accused of getting lost in the world of symbolic images. Jung, speaking to himself as well as to his disciples, warned, “Whatever you experience outside of the body, in a dream for instance, is not experienced unless you take it into the body, because the body means the here and now.” Using clinical examples Anita shall show how we can incorporate the image through sensory imagination.
 
Anita Greene, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) and Rubenfeld Synergist is a graduate of the Jung Institute of New York and teaches at the Jung Institute of Boston. She has a private practice in Amherst.
 
March 4, 2016
Russell Holmes: Michelangelo – The Three Pietas
 
When he was 23 years old, Michelangelo was commissioned to sculpt the religious image of Mary holding the body of her dead son for the tomb of a French cardinal. This Roman pieta is the sculpture with which we are all familiar. In his late middle age, he took up the image again in a pieta which he planned for his own tomb – the Florentine pieta. He was working on his final Milan pieta until several days before he died. This lecture will discuss the pietas in their historical, religious and symbolic contexts in the progressive expansion of an image from the genius of Michelangelo Buonaroti.
 
Russell Holmes, Jungian Analyst (IAAP), is a member of NESJA (New England Society of Jungian Analysts).
 
April 1, 2016
John Ryan Haule: Jung in the 21st Century
NOTE: For this lecture we will meet in Hillyer Graham Hall in the Fine Arts Building, Smith College
 
Jung was more deeply a scientist and more severely critical of science than most people know. His central passion was to show how psyche and cosmos mirror one another, being as much spiritual as material. The archetypes align psychology with evolution and synchronicity and lay the groundwork for a myth that is not only spiritually satisfying, but necessary in a time of climate change. Psychology, Jung says, is about learning to see.
 
John Ryan Haule, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) has a Ph.D. in religious studies and a diploma from the C. G. Jung Institute, Zurich. He has taught Jung’s Collected Works for over 30 years in Boston and published eight books and many articles. Website:jrhaule.net
 
May 6, 2016
Sarah Jackson: The Female Hero – from Ancient Myth to Modern Cinema
 
All the classic heroes described by Jung, Campbell, Graves, Auden, Kerenyi are either semi-divine or human men, and most of the literature on heroes focuses on male warriors, despite the fact that both ordinary and extraordinary women have been doing heroic things for centuries. In this lecture/discussion, we will examine a new group of female heroes who have been emerging in contemporary films, beginning with Ang Lee’s “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” [2000] and ending with “The Homesman”, “Divergent” and “Insurgent”, all released in 2015.
 
Sarah Jackson, MFA MA LP, is a NY licensed Jungian analyst (IAAP) and artist. She has been in private practice in Great Barrington MA since 1990.

 

2014 – 2015 Lecture Schedule

September 12, 2014

Psyche and Symbol: Joseph Campbell film lecture and discussion

“The material of myth is the material of our life, the material of our body, and the material of our environment. A living, vital mythology deals with these.” – Joseph Campbell

Featuring Psyche and Symbol from Joseph Campbell’s series, Mythos – what he calls “the one great story of mankind.” Campbell speaks to our psychological need for and response to myth. He explains how a functioning mythology serves both the individual and the society. He discusses Jung, summarizes ideas about the Self, the relationship between man and woman, and how these universal themes are accessible through art.

Jungian Analysts Anita Greene, Thayer Greene, Erica Lorentz, and Richard Trousdell will lead a discussion with the audience following the film.

October 3, 2014

Paul Sanderson: The Archetype of Betrayal – The Dark and Bright Side of the Individuation Process

We will reflect on the prevalence of betrayal motifs in myth and fairy tales, and discuss the impact of experiences of having been betrayed, betraying loved ones (including oneself) as well as what it might mean to betray the Self. We will also explore both the bright and the dark sides of betrayal, especially the role that this experience plays in the dawning of consciousness and the individuation process.

Paul D. Sanderson, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) is in private practice in Foxborough, MA.  He is a training analyst with and on the Training Board of the C. G. Jung Institute of Boston, a Pastor of the First Community Church of Southborough, and teaches psychology at Assumption College in Worcester.

November 7, 2014 Talk and Saturday Workshop November 8 – 9am-1pm

Penelope Tarasuk: Dreaming Animals

“I dreamed of two birds, one in each of my palms, one may be dead and one’s heart is beating…”

This work grew out of my deep interest in the appearance of animals in dreams of analysands over 45 years. In major life transitions, especially birth, death, and loss, they arrive and are experienced as helpful. What is the meaning of various animals coming to us in dreams or while waking? Which animals bring wisdom, terror, humor, beauty, and joy?  What is their relationship to our body and instinctual life?

November 8, 2014 Saturday workshop 9am – 1pm

We will deepen our exploration and have an opportunity to discuss animal dreams in depth.

Penelope Tarasuk, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) was the C. G Jung Institute of Boston’s first student in 1979. In practice 45 years, she has enjoyed many roles: psychotherapist, analyst, teacher, group facilitator, supervisor, and Director of Curriculum at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston.

December 5, 2014

Thayer Greene: Double Trouble and Relational Healing

This lecture will explore the negative dynamics that emerge between partners in a committed relationship or can even arise with a close friend. Conflict, alienation, reactive emotion, and unconscious projection occur frequently between two people who may share a mutual bond and affection for each other. What can be done to resolve and dissolve such barriers to a deeper connection?

Thayer Greene, Ph.D.  Jungian Analyst (IAAP), trained in New York and Zurich, Switzerland. He practices in Amherst, MA and is presently a training analyst of the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston. He has written a book and many articles in the field.

January 11, 2015 – Sunday 1:30-4:30 (NOTE DAY CHANGE – NOT FRIDAY)

Erica Lorentz: Dionysian Women’s (men included) Initiation Mysteries at Pompeii

Dionysus was the god of wine, emotion, ecstasy, eroticism, and madness. This important instinct has been lost or perverted by our workaholic, puritanical, progress oriented culture. How do we rediscover this wellspring of healthy instinctual energy? The beautiful 2000 year-old frescoes from Pompeii take us step by step on the initiate’s journey to a spiritual conjunction with Dionysus and his consort Ariadne, and back to ordinary reality to be integrated into our lives.

Erica Lorentz, M.Ed., L.P.C., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) has a private practice in Northampton, MA. She is a training analyst with the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston, and sits on its Training Board, and is the President of the Jung Association of Western Mass. Since the 1980s she has lectured and taught workshops in the US and Canada.

February 6, 2015

Anita Greene:Contempt/Shame

Of all the archetypal affects in us, shame is the most toxic and the most human of all the emotions. Lewis Stewart, who reassessed Jung’s thoughts about affects, believes that contempt and shame are two sides of the same bipolar emotional dynamic whether one is on the giving or receiving end. Both are the response to alienation and rejection.  Extreme contempt exudes a deprecating superiority. Extreme shame obliterates a sense of self-worth and authenticity.  Clinical examples will illustrate how this bipolar dynamic operates in all of us.

Anita Greene, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) and Rubenfeld Synergist is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and teaches at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston. She has a private practice in Amherst.

March 6, 2015

Sarah Jackson: Regarding Images: What Visual Art Can Teach Us

The premise of this lecture is that visual art can teach us how to work with, appreciate, and better understand our dreams, as well as all manner of images that arise and are presented to us by the psyche. Using contemporary and ancient visual art, we will explore ways to expand our ability to “stick with the image” (Pat Berry). We will also discuss symbol and image, and visually amplify Jung’s pivotal statement that “psyche is image”.

Sarah Jackson, M.F.A., M.A., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) is a visual artist who has exhibited widely. She is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and lives in Great Barrington, MA where she is in private practice.

April 3, 2015

Karen Smyers: Sky Mother and Earth Father: Ancient Egyptian Notions of Gender

The ancient Egyptians lived in a world of consciously held oppositions that they attempted to keep in balance. In this lecture, we will explore how they constructed gender, examining sociological roles of women and men, as well as archetypal notions of masculine and feminine in the realm of the gods. Some of their conceptions are striking: the sky is feminine and active, and the earth is masculine and inert. We will consider how these notions might expand the Jungian notions of anima and animus and eros and logos for 21st century humans.

Karen A. Smyers, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) is a former Associate Professor of Religion and Anthropology at Wesleyan University and a graduate of ISAP-Zurich. She has a private practice in Northampton.

May 1, 2015 Lecture and Saturday Workshop May 2, 2015

David Schoen: The War of the Gods in Addiction: The Psychodynamics of Addiction

Based on the correspondence between Bill W. and Carl Jung, this presentation will describe the development, true nature, and the role of archetypal shadow and evil in the addiction process. We will be presented with an overview of the psychodynamics of addiction, treatment, and recovery. Myth, fairytales, and clinical examples will illustrate the presentation.

May 2, 9am – 1pm Saturday workshop –

Archetypal Evil of Addiction in Fairy Tale, Myth, and Religion – (stay tuned for more information).

David Schoen, LCSW, MSSW, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) practices in New Orleans, LA. He was a chemical dependency counselor, is a training analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and is a poet. He has published internationally and teaches and lectures nationally.

Lecture Schedule 2013-2014

September 20, 2013

Transformation Through the Arts: Panel and Discussion

 

“And so it is with the hand that guides the crayon or brush, the foot that executes the dance step, with the eye and ear, with the word and thought: a dark (unconscious) impulse is the ultimate arbiter of the pattern, an unconscious a priori precipitates itself into plastic form… Over the whole procedure there seems to reign and dim foreknowledge not only of the pattern but of its meaning. Image and meaning are identical; and as the first takes shape, so the latter becomes clear.” C. G. Jung

 

Dr. Carl Jung was one of the first pioneers in the field of psychology to promote the healing power of the arts. In this presentation, four local specialists in the field of music, writing, visual arts, and movement, will join together to speak about the transformative experience of a dialogue with the unconscious through the medium of the arts, Jung’s preferred method. After individual presentations, the panel will invite questions from the audience.

 

Simone Alter Muri, Ph.D., L.M.H.C., A.C.T.S., holds a doctorate in Creative Behavior and Early Childhood Development. She is a Board Certified Art Therapist and the Director and Founder of the Art Therapy Programs at Springfield College. She has published presented and exhibited her art internationally.

 

Patricia Lee Lewis, M.F.A., has a masters degree in Creative Writing from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and a B.A. from Smith College. She leads creative writing retreats at Patchwork Farm in western MA and internationally.

 

Erica Lorentz, M.Ed., L.P.C., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) practices in Northampton, MA and Brattleboro, VT. She is a training analyst and on the training board of the Jung Institute of Boston. Since the 1980s she has lectured and taught workshops in the US and Canada. She has been an adjunct faculty member at Antioch New England, Keene, NH.

 

Bob Weiner is a drummer/percussionist interested in improvisation as contemplative practice (being in the moment, listening, expressing). He has studied and performed many kinds of music from around the world with Harry Belafonte, Andy Statman, Bob Moses, Kenny Werner, and (an unforgettable night) with Tiny Tim. He teaches privately and around the 5 Colleges in Amherst, MA.

 

October 4, 2013

Maggie Bromell: Holding the Opposites: Readings of Life, Love, and Desire on Nisos

 

In her book, NISOS, about a Greek island she and her family have known for over fifty years, Maggie brings to life for the readers’ imagination, stories of love and desire. The book also draws us into the life of the island as it persists, guarded by its range of mountains and the sea. After her reading, she will discuss the psychological power of Jung’s practice of “holding the opposites” as portrayed by her beautiful descriptions of the island community. A book review states, “The sun shines down on this book.”

 

Maggie Bromell, M.A., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) holds a Masters degree in English-American Literature from the American University in Cairo, Egypt and a Masters degree in Education from Boston University. She graduated from the Jung Institute of Boston and practices in Northampton, MA.

 

November 1, 2013

Deborah Gregory: Personal, Collective, and Archetypal Dynamisms of Money

 

Many people have openly questioned the motivations of the men and women within the financial world who have been deemed responsible for the financial crisis that has caused suffering and chaos globally since 2008. As with previous financial calamities, the greediness of Wall Street bankers is often cited. The callousness and unwillingness of investment bankers, among others, to take responsibility in this crisis has prompted some to suggest that financial psychopaths are to blame. By exploring the personal, collective and archetypal dynamisms of money, we can develop a deeper understanding of the role each of us plays in the money culture of today.

 

Deborah W. Gregory, Ph.D., C.F.A., is a Jungian Analyst (IAAP) and finance professor.  Her current research focuses on linking psychoanalytic and financial theories. She is a member of the New England Society of Jungian Analysts and the Boston Security Analysts Society.

 

December 6, 2013

Thayer Greene: Psychological Reflections of an Aging Combat Veteran

 

Since 500BC for every year of peace in the world there have been fourteen years of war. My goal in this lecture is convey to the deeply personal experience of the combat soldier with all of the emotions of terror, shame, excitement, loyalty and bonding with others that create the mixture of cowardice and courage involved in the business of killing or being killed under extreme physical conditions. A brief clip from the Omaha Beach landing will provide us with the best representation of the chaos and horror of extreme combat experience. I shall give a number of psychological observations on individual and group experiences of war on a day-to-day reality. Beyond the individual experience lies the archetype of war itself.

 

Thayer Greene, Ph.D., is a graduate of the Jung Institute of New York, and a training analyst at the Jung Institute of Boston. He has a private practice in Amherst.

 

January 10, 2014

Richard Trousdell: Death and Necessity at the Threshold of New Life

 

Facing death’s necessity is never easy, but Jung suggests psychological approaches to it that may help. We will look at such approaches in fact and fiction: first in an ancient play, the delightful Alcestis of Euripides, and then in the journal of a modern woman who faced death through her dreams.  Both the ancient play and the modern dreamer suggest ways to approach death as a fulfillment as well as a necessity.

 

Richard Trousdell, D.F.A., is a Jungian Analyst (IAAP) in Northampton, MA and Professor Emeritus of Theater at UMASS-Amherst.  His paper on traumatic hero/victim roles in tragedy and modern life is available in Ancient Greece, Modern Psyche, Spring Journal Books (2011).

 

February 7, 2014

Anita Greene: Contempt/Shame

 

Of the archetypal affects universal to human beings, extreme shame is, perhaps, the most toxic as well as the most human of all the emotions. Lewis Stewart, who reassessed Jung’s thoughts about affects, believes that contempt and shame belong together as two sides of the same bipolar emotional dynamic, depending on whether one is on the giving or receiving end. Both are the human response to alienation and rejection.  Contempt in its extreme form exudes a deprecating superiority, similar to today’s bullying. Shame, in its extreme form obliterates a sense of self-worth and authenticity.  Clinical examples will demonstrate how this bipolar dynamic operates in all of us.

 

Anita Greene, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst and Rubenfeld Synergist is a graduate of the New York Jung Institute and teaches at the Boston Jung Institute. She has a private practice in Amherst.

 

March 7, 2014

Erica Lorentz: Dreams: Inner Teaching Stories

 

“The dream is a little hidden door in the innermost recesses of the soul, opening into that cosmic night which was psyche long before there was any ego consciousness.” C.G. Jung

 

Dreams have guided us since time immemorial. Scientists and creative individuals look to them for inspiration. In this lecture, we will explore how these inner teaching stories invite us to reflect on our conscious attitudes and actions that have become outmoded. Dreams have very specific information to help us rebalance the psyche and to grow psychologically and spiritually. Case material and a video will illustrate how dreams can guide us towards deep transformation on both the personal and archetypal levels.

 

Erica Lorentz, M.Ed., L.P.C., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) has a practice in Northampton, MA and Brattleboro, VT. She is a training analyst and on the training board of the Jung Institute of Boston. Since the 1980’s she has lectured and taught workshops in the US and Canada. She has been an adjunct faculty member at Antioch New England, Keene, NH.

 

April 4, 2014

Ira Sharkey: Tantalus: On Recognition and Psychic Nourishment

 

Jung equated psychic health with the capacity for dialogue between the conscious and unconscious parts of the psyche. At birth, this capacity is only an innate potential requiring a caregiver’s responsive attentiveness to the child’s affective experience if it is to develop and mature. The portrayal of Demeter as devouring due to her distractedness in the Greek story of Tantalus reflects the importance of the role of attention in creating a relational environment that supports psychological development and nurtures individual growth. The aim of the talk is to elaborate this theme in relation to Jung’s thoughts concerning psychotherapy, and to the topic of psychotherapy in general.

 

Ira Sharkey, M.F.A., L.M.H.C., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) is a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute-Zurich. He serves as both instructor and supervisor at the C. G. Jung Institute – Boston. He is in private practice in Amherst, MA.

 

May 2, 2014

William Ventimiglia: Ambition, Limitation, and the Desire for a Significant Life

 

What does it mean to live a significant life?  What gives a human life value in the dynamic tension between ego ambition on the one hand and realistic limitation on the other?  Or to pose our questions a little differently: do our individual efforts to live up to our own potential— however great or limited our natural gifts and real-world circumstances may be— really count for much in the grand scheme of things?  Through lecture and discussion, we will have an opportunity to engage with this eternal searching after our personal raison d’être.

William Ventimiglia, D.Min., Jungian Analyst (IAAP), is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of Zurich, Switzerland.   He is a past-president of the Training Board of the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston and the New England Society of Jungian Analysts.  He has a private practice in Cambridge and Topsfield, MA.

Lecture Schedule 2012-2013

September 21, 2012

“Face to Face” Jung’s BBC Interview

 

This BBC interview with C.G. Jung, filmed when he was eighty-four years of age, is alive with the easy-going wit of his wisdom and conversational manner. We are fortunate to have this living legacy of ideas — quietly hinted at here — that hewed a new direction for the world’s psychological perceptions. A panel of three (Thayer Greene, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst, Nomi Kluger-Nash, Ph.D., Jungian Psychologist, and Karen Smyers, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst) will respond and relate.

 

October 12, 2012

John Peck: Seeing Into Some Paintings in Jung’s Red Book

 

With two series of these paintings, the first begun in 1917 and the other carried out in the late 1920s, my objective will be to promote a three-dimensional perception of what is at stake in them, through both texts and images. Not a decoding, but an in-sighting, is what we want to manage, and I shall try to demonstrate how one might do that.

 

John Peck, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst practicing in Higganum, CT, a freelance editor-translator for the Philemon Foundation, and the author of twelve books of poetry, most recently Contradance (University of Chicago) and I Came, I Saw (Shearsman).

 

November 9, 2012

Soren Ekstrom: Narratives and Metaphors in Dreams: Perspectives on Dreams from Neuroscience and Sleep Research

 

This lecture will focus on recent data from sleep research and neuroscience and how these findings can be incorporated into a Jungian understanding of dreams. Dreams interpreted by Jung and by Freud will be examined, as well as dreams from two patients in analysis. A current understanding of memory, in particular episodic memory and remembrance of past events, will also be discussed.

 

Soren Ekstrom, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and Jungian analyst. He has published papers about cognitive science, psychoanalysis, and Jungian topics in various journals. He teaches and supervises at the Jung Institute of Boston and is currently working on a book titled Memory and Healing.

 

December 14, 2012

Thayer Greene: On Being a Couple

 

When two people meet and are deeply drawn and attracted to each other, what is happening beneath the surface at forty fathoms deep in their psyches?  Coupling is a universal phenomenon, which has drawn the interest of poets, music makers, writers, and psychologists through the ages. What is it that makes a couple a couple so that some endure through a lifetime and some self-destruct? My lecture will attempt to cover at least the basics of such a difficult and complex question.

 

Thayer Greene, Ph.D., is a graduate of the Jung Institute of New York, and a training analyst and faculty member of the Jung Institute of Boston. He has a private practice in Amherst.

 

January 11, 2013

Erica Lorentz: Active imagination: Accessing our Creative Imagination

 

Jung’s preferred method of working was active imagination– a conscious dialogue with the unconscious. The Sufis call the imaginable realm intersecting us with the divine the Mundus Imaginalis. It is in this creative space that we find healing, inspiration, and a relationship to the source. This lecture will include discussion, case material, film clips, and a little of our own creativity.

 

Erica Lorentz, MEd, LPC, Jungian Analyst has a private practice in Northampton and Brattleboro, Vermont. She is on the training board of the Jung Institute of Boston where she is a training analyst and is president of the Western Mass Jung Center. Formerly an adjunct faculty member at Antioch New England, she has also taught throughout the U.S. and Canada.

 

February 8, 2013

Anita Greene: Archetypal Affects

 

Jung’s prescience in 1907 regarding affects as the primary motivating source of psyche is now being demonstrated in neurobiological research, how embodied emotional reactivity from birth shapes our sense of self long before the cognitive spheres become active. The archetypal affects – fear, anger, grief, and shame – are universal to all human beings. This presentation will explore the importance of becoming more consciously attuned to how these archetypal affects shape our relationships and our sense of self.

 

Anita Greene, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and Rubenfeld Synergist. She is a graduate of the New York Institute, teaches at the Jung Institute of Boston Institute, and has a private practice in Amherst.

 

March 8, 2013                                                                            

Penelope Tarasuk: Turning a Blind Eye  

 

A “blind” eye suggests that the other eye can see. If we see we are involved and experience below the realm of words and thoughts. The body sees and knows. Oedipus blinding himself at the crossroad, Hecate turning away from Persephone’s cries, Cassandra, an early whistle blower, being hated for holding up the mirror . . . how does this manifest in the collective, in ourselves?

 

Student at the newly formed Boston Jung Institute in 1978, Penelope came to her studies by way of dreams, suffering, nature, service, and art. Training analyst, curriculum development coordinator and training board member; she has served many roles over 34 years. Her book: Raft of Dreams has an agent. She has a private practice and is writing a memoir.

 

April 12, 2013

Karen Smyers: Ancient Egyptian Wisdom: Hints for Healing the Split

 

The ancient Egyptians lived in a land of stark geographical contrasts: the lush fertile “black land” bordering the Nile and the dry, uninhabitable “red land” of the desert. This polarity permeated their religion and mythology, where the extremes were held in a creative and healthy tension. We will examine images, concepts, and stories that embody this balance in an effort to find models to mediate our own increasingly polarized contemporary situation (psychological, social, moral, political). For Jung, the ability to hold the tension of the opposites is the key to individuation.

 

Karen A. Smyers, Ph.D., former Associate Professor of Religion and Anthropology at Wesleyan University and a graduate of ISAP-Zurich. She has a private practice in Northampton.

 

May 2, 2013 (Neilson Library Browsing Room)

Donald Kalsched: Trauma and the Soul: Psycho-Spiritual Considerations in Clinical Practice

 

People who have suffered severe childhood trauma often describe the experience of being “broken,” or of having “lost their souls.”  When the psychotherapy process begins, and the broken places begin to heal, dreams show how the soul returns from its exile in the unconscious.  But there are equally powerful defensive forces that resist this return. In this lecture Donald Kalsched will explore this essentially “spiritual” struggle with both clinical and mythological illustrations.

Donald Kalsched, Ph.D., Jungian Psychoanalyst with a private practice in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He is the author of the recently released Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-Spiritual Approach to Human Development and its Interruption (Routledge 2013).  

Lecture Schedule 2011-2012

September 9, 2011

Video presentation and panal discussion: Appointment with the Wise Old Dog: Dream Images in a Time of Crisis

Moderator: Don Charles Wukasch, M.D., MFA, Diploma Candidate, Jung Institute-Boston Panelists: Barbara Bronson, Nomi Kluger-Nash, Erica Lorentz, and Richard Trousdell

 

In 1998, when musician David Blum was dying from cancer, he had a series of profound dreams that he then painted. The images and their message helped him move into his death in a conscious and accepting way. He felt that this material came from a source deeper than his individual ego, and felt that sharing it might help others to become aware of that source within themselves. We will watch this moving film, and then have an open discussion with a panel of Jungian analysts.

 

October 14, 2011

Richard Trousdell: The Waters of Life

 

Water is the source of life and necessary to it. In our dreams, as well as in our everyday experience, the waters of life flow pure and abundantly–or get muddied, freeze, and dry up. Water may come to our aid, to cleanse and refresh us–or it may threaten to overwhelm, carry us away, and destroy our world. We will explore the significance of water in dreams, fairy tales, the process of individuation, and in the life of psyche.

 

Richard Trousdell, D.F.A., IAAP, is a Jungian Analyst in Northampton. He holds a Doctorate in Fine Arts from Yale University and a Diploma in Jungian Analysis from the C. G. Jung Institute, Boston where he also serves on the faculty.

 

November 11, 2011 Erica Lorentz: Jung, Spirituality, and the Body

 

This lecture will investigate the importance of witnessing and containing archetypal energies when they become embodied in our lives. The individuation process asks us to return to our personal unconscious and archetypal roots. Jung invites us to honor archetypal forces that push into consciousness. These experiences are often pathologized, though they have been observed since the beginning of human history. How can we have a relationship with them?

 

Erica Lorentz, Med, LPC, is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Northampton, MA. A training analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and the New England Society of Jungian Analysts, she was an adjunct faculty at Antioch School of Professional Psychology and has lectured around the US and Canada.

 

December 9, 2011

Thayer Greene: The Language of Dreams: Images From the Depths That Chart the Path of Individuation

 

This presentation will explore the imaginal language of our dreams and consider the various stages of the individuation process using examples from the dreams of clients. Attention will be given to the importance of initial dreams in analysis and how they portray the particular individuation potential of the dreamer and what may be required in the analytic encounter. A rather remarkable dream series will be presented and discussed in detail that illustrates the unfolding of the individuation process.

 

Thayer Greene, Ph.D., is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, and a training analyst and faculty member of the Jung Institute of Boston. He has a private practice in Amherst.

 

January 13, 2012

Nomi Kluger-Nash: Serving Justice

 

On the day America so deftly, so heroically, captured bin Laden, and that night rejoiced in the streets at his death, I heard from the pundits and the people a triumphant and much repeated phrase, “Justice has been served.” I immediately grabbed a pad and pencil and wrote “Serving Justice,” wondering on what “she” is being served and how. In this talk I want to trace the concepts and images of justice in religion and myth and how these effect daily life, nightly dreams, the world over.

 

Nomi Kluger-Nash, Ph.D., Jungian Psychologist, was Ombuds for the Palestinians and Israelis when living in Jerusalem. In private practice since 1978 she also teaches at the Jung Institute in Switzerland.

 

February 10, 2012

Chris Beach: Does Your Psychological Type Influence Your Dreams?

 

If psychological type has any validity, we might anticipate that individuals of one psychological type will in some ways dream differently than those of other types. I will present an overview of the type model and offer a sampling of dreams from individuals of different psychological types. Can you begin to imagine the patterns we will see?

 

Chris Beach, a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute – Zurich, has a private practice in Portland, ME. He offers dream groups as well as courses on dream interpretation, psychological type, active imagination, and ethics, and is writing a book on psychological type. He formerly served as a headmaster in Kenya and as an Assistant Attorney General covering healthcare law in Maine.

 

March 9, 2012

Barbara Bronson: Active Imagination in the Healing of Early Wounding

 

Starting with spontaneous drawings and sandplay, I will describe the case of a middle age woman who traveled a highway without destination signs for several years. Then her psyche presented her with a healing active imagination drama that spanned several months. We will view and hear some highlights of her journey.

 

Barbara Bronson is a graduate of the Jung Institute-Zurich and has practiced for over twenty years. She has lectured, taught seminars internationally, and spent time in Perth, Australia as Analyst in Residence. Co-founder of the Jung Center of Western Massachusetts, serving two terms as president and as on the Board for thirteen years, she has a private practice in Amherst.

 

April 13, 2012

Anita Greene: Thinking With Your Belly

 

Why not? – now that research in the neurobiological field is debunking the Cartesian mind/body split that has dominated our culture for so long. Mind/body evolves out of the same evolutionary process. We are one. Reason and emotion, not enemies, but essential companions on life’s journey. We, as Jungians, who value the mind’s capacity for symbolic thinking and image making need to become more experientially attuned to body and subjective emotional reaction. In essence we often think with our bellies and feel with our minds.

 

Anita Greene, Ph.D., is a Jungian Analyst and Rubenfeld Synergist. She is a graduate of the New York Institute, teaches at the Boston Institute, and has a private practice in Amherst.

 

May 4, 2012

Maggie Bromell: On the Archetype of Home

 

“Home” is an ancient and familiar archetype. Home is always just around the corner on the pathway into the future or into the past. The longing for home is as deeply entrenched in the contemporary psyche as it was, so long ago, in the psyche of Ulysses as he sailed the Aegean and Adriatic seas. Sometimes home is a particular place, other times, home is a matter of particular people. We will look at the concept and meaning of home in old and new texts and venture into the world of psyche to find, at its heart, “home.”

Maggie Bromell, MA, IAAP, is a Jungian psychoanalyst practicing in Northampton. A graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute-Boston, she is also on the Institute teaching staff.

2010-2011 Lecture Schedule

October 8, 2010

Thayer Greene: The Shadow as Archetype and Personal Dilemma

Jung’s explorations of the shadow side of the individual and collective human psyche were both extensive and profound. This lecture attempts to provide a summary of his insights as well as more recent Jungian thinking in the following categories: 1. The shadow as a moral and ethical dilemma. 2. The shadow as an instinctual and somatic dilemma. 3. The shadow as an affective and energetic dilemma. 4. The dilemma of the individual in relation to the collective shadow. 5. The shadow as an archetypal dilemma, i.e., the problem of evil.

Thayer Greene, Ph.D. is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, a training analyst, a faculty member of the Jung Institute of Boston, and has lectured widely and is the author of a book and a number of articles in the field. He has a private practice in Amherst.

November 12, 2010

Karen A. Smyers: Does the Soul Like Facebook? Exploring the Friendship Archetype

Facebook has become a pervasive social force in the world today, with more than 500 million active users. Is this a natural and healthy extension of friendship into the latest medium, or a narcissistic and/or voyeuristic shadow of true relatedness, mediated by a business model? This talk will explore the meanings and varieties of friendship and its archetypal underpinnings, and will consider what the soul gains and loses as humans move more and more into “virtual” relationships.

 

Karen A. Smyers, Ph.D., is a former Associate Professor at Wesleyan University and a graduate of ISAP-Zurich. She has a private practice in Hadley, and is the current President of the Jung Center of Western Massachusetts.

 

December 10, 2010

Nomi Kluger-Nash: The Poetics of Dream: Our Truth Telling Visions of Night and of Day

 

Psyche’s symbolic speech can loose its subtle nuances if one looks too fast for an interpretation rather than allowing the symbol—always representing something unknown–to continually unfold of itself, and doing so by virtue of our honoring its presence and affect. As personal and unique as these images may be, we can nonetheless find in dreams sufficient universality to justify Jung’s notion of an Objective Psyche, the Collective Unconscious. Through the telling of dreams we shall view and explore images as illustrations in word and meaning of Jung’s basic concepts of Archetype, Complex, Shadow, Anima/Animus and the individuating journey to the Self.

 

Nomi Kluger-Nash, Ph.D., is a Jungian Psychologist and author, teaching at the Jung Institute in Switzerland. She has a private practice in Amherst.

 

January 14, 2011

Anita Greene, Ph.D: The  Present Moment-Living in the Here and Now

 

Jung once said, “But the great thing is the here and now, this is the eternal moment, and if you do not realize it, you have missed the best part of your life.” What is the present moment? Surely it has to do with qualitative rather than quantitative time, with Kairos rather than Kronos. To be fully present to moments of intense and truly lived experience requires a profound coming together of the emotional, imaginal and sensory realms of our beings. If the experience of “nowness” contributes to psychic growth and change, how can we nurture this experience within ourselves, in our relationship to others and in our creative living and working? Come and explore together.

 

Anita Greene, Ph.D., is a Jungian Analyst and Rubenfeld Synergist.  She is a graduate of the New York Institute where she taught and supervised  for many years.  She now teaches at the Boston Institute and has a private practice in Amherst.

 

February 11, 2011

Penny Tarasuk, Ph.D.: Curving Inward Toward the Heart: Confronting One’s Shadow and a Life’s Completion

Reading from her current manuscript, Penelope shares a woman’s dream of confrontation with shadow as a climax of years of analysis. Facing and touching the murderous, injured mother and vulnerable, needy child within becomes a means of self-redemption and recognition of self-compassion.

 

Penelope Tarasuk, Ph.D., a Jungian psychoanalyst, has a private practice in South Deerfield. Her workshops and lectures in the United States and abroad focus upon dreaming, active imagination, nature, art and body in spiritual development. She is a member of the Training Board of the C.G. Jung Institute-Boston, training analyst, and faculty. Her deepest interests include accessing the heart of creativity through dream- image-embodiment, the wake of trauma and development of spiritual life.

 

March 11, 2011

Russell Holmes, M.A.: As You Speak, So Is Your Heart

 

With this remark of Paracelsus as a cue, Holmes will discuss the numerous meanings of the heart as a pump, a book, a thought, and as the locus of the Self with references to literary, religious, philosophical, and Jungian themes.

 

Russell Holmes, MA, a Jungian analyst practicing in Jamaica Plain, is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute, Zurich.

 

April 8, 2011

Manisha Roy, Ph.D.: Symptom, Symbol, Soul: How Symptoms Become Symbols to Heal Souls

This talk narrates how physical and emotional symptoms are often manifestations of deeper symbols produced by the collective unconscious. Put another way this is also a discussion of a symbolic approach to psychosomatic illnesses. As analysts we can never predict the formation and emergence of symbols in our analysands. Cases from my practice will be used to show the formation of such healing symbols.

 

Manisha Roy, Ph.D. is a former professor of anthropology at various universities including Chicago, Colorado and Zurich. She is a diplomate of the C.G Jung Institute-Zurich and has been at the faculty of Boston Jung Institute since 1985 and is in private practice in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Roy has lectured all over the world in both fields and has authored six books and twenty-five articles. She also writes fiction in both English and her mother tongue, Bengali, and does watercolor paintings among other things.

2009-2010 Lecture Schedule

September 25, 2009

Karen A. Smyers, Ph.D., IAAP: The Canny Feminine: Problem Solving Through the Union of Eros and Logos

 

One of the most dangerous characteristics of our time is a stark splitting that occurs at psychological, social, and cultural levels. From within these polarized fundamentalisms, problem solving often works through confrontation and aggression, paying little attention to the relationship between the parties or the dignity of the other. What I have termed “the canny feminine” is a way of solving problems that preserves eros. It works through indirection, humor, and suggestion in a conscious modality, but one open to the gifts from the unconscious. Stories from the Bible to contemporary popular culture show that this modality is deeply human and has always been with us. I argue that it is another model of individuation.

Karen A. Smyers is a graduate of ISAP-Zürich and has a private practice in Northampton.

 

October 23, 2009

Ethne J. Gray, IAAP: Archetypal Patterns in Ancient Dream Incubation

 

“He Who Wounds Also Heals.”

Jungian analyst, Ethne Gray will discuss dreams as wounded and wounded healers, and the patron god of the dream incubation temples, Aesclepius, as divine patient. Remembering how music, art, drama and therapeutic waters played a role in the holistic dream incubation rituals at Cos and Epidaurus in Greece, she will also examine central images of the healing temple temenos: serpents, trees, dog, centaur (Chiron), and the feminine trinity, and explore their meanings for our dream work today.

 

Ethne J. Gray, born in South Africa, has lived and worked in many lands including Kenya, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Indonesia and Columbia, where she enjoyed learning religious, mythic and healing rituals. She is in private practice in West Newton and Cambridge, and is on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute Boston. She teaches Jungian Art Therapy at Lesley University.

 

December 4, 2009

Ira Sharkey: Coming Full Circle: The Challenge of Return and of Self-recollection in the Process of Individuation

 

Ira Sharkey will review Jung’s essay entitled “The Transcendent Function” (CW 8: para 131-193, pp.67-91). Jung observes that “the circle of consciousness is continually widened through confrontation with previously unconscious contents.” Ira will examine with us the notion of the “circle of consciousness” and consider some of the intricacies and difficulties inherent to the process of its “widening” stated in Jung’s formulation.

 

Ira Sharkey is a graduate of the Jung Institute-Zürich. He in private practice in Amherst and is an instructor at the Jung Institute-Boston.

 

January 22, 2010

Anita Greene Ph.D., IAAP & Thayer Greene, Ph.D., IAAP: Aging Body Ageless Spirit

Coming To Age: Journey Into Wisdom or Despair

The emphasis on youth in our culture does not make it easy for us to go graciously into old age now that we live in an era in which our longevity, at least in developed countries, has been increased by 25 years. In earlier cultures elders were honored in their tribes and villages as carriers of ancestral lore and rituals of daily life which held the community together and made it unique. Old age is a developmental process with its own singular characteristics. We may think of it as the third major part of life which earlier centuries rarely had to confront.  Anita and Thayer will share their psychological reflections on this emerging phenomenon in our contemporary culture.

Anita and Thayer Greene are graduates of the New York Jung Institute and are in private practice in Amherst.

 

February 26, 2010.

Jim Helling and Thayer Greene, IAAP: The Theory and Treatment of Severe Trauma from a Jungian and Neuroscientific Perspective

The word “trauma” has become current in our public discourse due to the impact of war’s effect upon the psyches of those who fight. In fact trauma has been a part of human experience since the beginning. Recent research has demonstrated the profound effects of trauma upon the integrated function of body, mind, and spirit. This presentation will combine a Jungian perspective with suggestions from recent neuroscientific studies to explore both the dissociative effects of trauma and a path toward integration and healing.

 

Thayer Greene, Ph.D., serves on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston and is in private practice in Amherst.

 

James Helling, LICSW, is a graduate of   the Smith College School for Social Work and also has been certified in Traumatic Stress Studies by the Trauma Center at JRI in Boston under the direction of Bessell von der Kolk, MD. He has a private practice in Amherst and is associated with the University of Massachusetts.  

 

March 26, 2010.

Richard Trousdell,  D.F.A., IAAP: Tragedy and Transformation; the Oresteia of Aeschylus,

Classical Greek tragedy dramatizes mythic patterns of human suffering and human survival that are still alive and meaningful to us today. The Libation Bearers of Aeschylus takes us into the lives of two trauma survivors: Electra and Orestes, the cast-off children of a father who sacrificed their sister to win a war, and a mother who murdered their father in revenge. Although Electra and Orestes survive their traumatic past, it is at the cost of their full humanity. Their family fate forces them into defensive character patterns we still recognize in ourselves: a hero defense strategy that defines and distorts Orestes, and a victim identification pattern that preserves but traps Electra. How they come to terms with these archetypal roles, and grow beyond them, tells an inspiring story of how conscious suffering can lead to becoming more fully human.

 

Richard Trousdell is in private practice in Northampton and a Professor Emeritus of Theater at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He is a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute-Boston, where he has taught and served on the Admissions Committee.

 

April 23, 2010

Pamela Donleavy, J.D., IAAP: The Individuation Process in Dreams

Individuation, or self-realization, is an unconscious developmental process that occurs in the personality itself. It can often be discerned as a planned and orderly unfolding that spontaneously expresses itself in the symbolism of a dream series. In this lecture, we will explore this process as it appeared as a source of healing during the course of an analysis.

Pamela Donleavy is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Arlington, MA. She is the past President of the New England Society of Jungian Analysts, the Vice President of the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis, and is on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute-Boston, and the Assisi Institute in Vermont. She wrote with Ann Shearer From Ancient Myth to Modern Healing, Themis: Goddess of Heart-Soul, Justice and Reconciliation, published by Routledge.